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Mountain Logic Gear Guide

Sleeping Bags and Pads

When it comes to sleeping at altitude, you'll find there's a little bit more to it than just counting sheep. The rating of your sleeping bag, what it's filled with, the type of pad you use, and even your pre-bed routine all play a part in making sure you're well-rested for your climb. 

There's a ton of info in this post, so we've grouped it under a few sections below. Just click the tab to get the information you're interested in!

Here are some of our suggested sleeping pads:

ProLite™ Plus
ProLite™ Plus
ProLite™ Plus
ProLite™ Plus

ProLite™ Plus

$94.95
NeoAir® XLite™ Sleeping Pad
NeoAir® XLite™ Sleeping Pad

NeoAir® XLite™ Sleeping Pad

$169.95
Instant Field Repair Kit
Instant Field Repair Kit

Instant Field Repair Kit

$9.95

The Logic Behind Sleeping Bags

A sleeping bag should do two things: keep you warm, and keep you dry. A sleeping bag’s job is to help you sleep comfortably and protect your body from the elements. When choosing a sleeping bag, be sure to consider elevation, temperature, climate and terrain, as well as your sleeping preferences.The two primary considerations when choosing a bag are insulation type and temperature rating. Let’s start with the two main insulation types: synthetic and down.

Insulation

Let’s start with the two main insulation types: synthetic and down.

Synthetic Insulation consists of very fine, tightly woven fibers that form small air pockets to trap body heat. They dry quickly and stay warm when wet. Synthetic insulation is best in a wide range of conditions, as synthetic fibers will not absorb moisture.

Down Insulation is a natural insulation and the most packable of the insulation types. Goose or duck down plumes provide warmth by trapping body heat within the space between down clusters that insulate the garment. Down is best in cold climates and where less weight is optimal, as the warmth-to-weight ratio is the highest. Note: There are new treatments that some manufacturers use that prevent the down clusters from collapsing when wet, therefore helping them maintain warmth even in the presence of moisture.

Temperature Rating

Sleeping cold leads to not much sleep at all. When choosing your sleeping bag, match the temperature rating of the bag to anticipated temperatures of the location you’ll be in. Keep in mind not all rating systems are the same between manufacturers.

Consider the following when choosing a bag:
1. What are the lowest anticipated temperatures?2. Sleeping surface? Snow? Rock? Scree?3. What is your sleeping style- Do you sleep cold or hot? 4. Wet climate or dry?

Section

Guide Tip

"Prepare for the worst, hope for the best. That’s my philosophy. I always go with a bag that’s 5-10 degrees colder than the anticipated low temperatures. For me, the extra ounces are worth it for a little more warmth and a good night’s sleep. "

 - Peter Whittaker

Here are some of our suggested sleeping bags:

Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag

Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag

$200.00
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag

Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag

$190.00
Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag

Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag

$280.00

Sleeping Bag Care and Maintenance

Proper care and maintenance are key to getting the most life out of your bag, and in helping to sustain its temperature rating.

Washing

  • Use a specialized soap, specific to insulation type. 
  • Don't use a washer with an agitator (use a front loader instead)
  • Hang-dry or throw into a large-capacity dryer (with a few tennis balls)

Storage

  • Be sure the bag is 100% dry before storing
  • Do not leave bag in a stuff sack for extended periods
  • Hanging sleeping bags is best

The Logic Behind Sleeping Bags

A sleeping bag should do two things: keep you warm, and keep you dry. A sleeping bag’s job is to help you sleep comfortably and protect your body from the elements. When choosing a sleeping bag, be sure to consider elevation, temperature, climate and terrain, as well as your sleeping preferences.The two primary considerations when choosing a bag are insulation type and temperature rating. Let’s start with the two main insulation types: synthetic and down.

Insulation

Let’s start with the two main insulation types: synthetic and down.

Synthetic Insulation consists of very fine, tightly woven fibers that form small air pockets to trap body heat. They dry quickly and stay warm when wet. Synthetic insulation is best in a wide range of conditions, as synthetic fibers will not absorb moisture.

Down Insulation is a natural insulation and the most packable of the insulation types. Goose or duck down plumes provide warmth by trapping body heat within the space between down clusters that insulate the garment. Down is best in cold climates and where less weight is optimal, as the warmth-to-weight ratio is the highest. Note: There are new treatments that some manufacturers use that prevent the down clusters from collapsing when wet, therefore helping them maintain warmth even in the presence of moisture.

Temperature Rating

Sleeping cold leads to not much sleep at all. When choosing your sleeping bag, match the temperature rating of the bag to anticipated temperatures of the location you’ll be in. Keep in mind not all rating systems are the same between manufacturers.

Consider the following when choosing a bag:
1. What are the lowest anticipated temperatures?2. Sleeping surface? Snow? Rock? Scree?3. What is your sleeping style- Do you sleep cold or hot? 4. Wet climate or dry?

Guide Tip

"Prepare for the worst, hope for the best. That’s my philosophy. I always go with a bag that’s 5-10 degrees colder than the anticipated low temperatures. For me, the extra ounces are worth it for a little more warmth and a good night’s sleep. "

 - Peter Whittaker

Here are some of our Guide Pick sleeping bags:

Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag

Mountain Hardwear

Women's Lamina™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag

View Details
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag
Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag

Mountain Hardwear

Lamina™ 15F Sleeping Bag

View Details
Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag
Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag

Mountain Hardwear

Lamina Eco AF™ 15F/-9C Sleeping Bag

View Details

Sleeping Bag Care and Maintenance

Proper care and maintenance are key to getting the most life out of your bag, and in helping to sustain its temperature rating.

Washing

  • Use a specialized soap, specific to insulation type. 
  • Don't use a washer with an agitator (use a front loader instead)
  • Hang-dry or throw into a large-capacity dryer (with a few tennis balls)

Storage

  • Be sure the bag is 100% dry before storing
  • Do not leave bag in a stuff sack for extended periods
  • Hanging sleeping bags is best

Hopefully this guide helps you pick the perfect Mountaineering boots! If you have any questions, feel free to email us at info@whittakermountaineering.com.